ART OF THE DESIGN: THE Y&R LOGO

YoungandtheRestless1984

When “The Young and the Restless” made its’ debut on CBS back in 1973, the title design was something that had not been done on daytime before. Using the song “Cotton’s Dream” from the movie “Bless The Beasts and the Children”, the title designer Sandy Dvore gave Y&R its’ signature look of drawings of cast members of the show.

But in 1984, the title designer made the iconic painted Y&R logo. And it has not changed at all to something different.

When it debuted, the logo painted itself on-screen. To accomplish this, the logo had to be set apart in four different parts as using a switcher, each part painted on then faded to red with the title of the show over it. The drawings at the end over closing credits gave way to this logo (the only exception was during the era when Susan Banks and Harry Hall made the cast as paintings that came to life-however the logo was everywhere else).

The logo itself was presented in different ways. In 1999, the cast was shown against a red velvet background, the logo was clear acrylic over the background with a jazzy version of the theme and cast names were added when CBS and other countries did away with the show’s closing credits; in 2004, the show went back to the 1998 theme and the logo double-painted itself in an extreme close-up focusing on the right side of the logo.

In 2017, the logo and title flash. on the screen when paint strokes are ethereal with the cast in the painting. And the lady that walked towards you in the black lingerie from the previous opening is barely there disappearing in a segue of flashes before the logo is revealed towards the end.

When “The Young and the Restless” made its’ debut on CBS back in 1973, the title design was something that had not been done on daytime before. Using the song “Cotton’s Dream” from the movie “Bless The Beasts and the Children”, the title designer Sandy Dvore gave Y&R its’ signature look of drawings of cast members of the show.

But in 1984, the title designer made the iconic painted Y&R logo. And it has not changed at all to something different.

When it debuted, the logo painted itself on-screen. To accomplish this, the logo had to be set apart in four different parts as using a switcher, each part painted on then faded to red with the title of the show over it. The drawings at the end over closing credits gave way to this logo (the only exception was during the era when Susan Banks and Harry Hall made the cast as paintings that came to life-however the logo was everywhere else).

The logo itself was presented in different ways. In 1999, the cast was shown against a red velvet background, the logo was clear acrylic over the background with a jazzy version of the theme and cast names were added when CBS and other countries did away with the show’s closing credits; in 2004, the show went back to the 1998 theme and the logo double-painted itself in an extreme close-up focusing on the right side of the logo.

In 2017, the logo and title flashes on the screen when paint strokes are ethereal with the cast in the painting. And the lady that walked towards you in the black lingerie from the previous opening is barely there disappearing in a segue of flashes before the logo is revealed towards the end.

This logo may have been presented in different ways but the concept remains the same. And after 33 years of it, it has held up well. It has proven to be very versatile everytime with each title design change.

This logo may have been presented in different ways but the concept remains the same. And after 33 years of it, it has held up well. It has proven to be very versatile everytime with each title design change.  And a hats off to Sandy Dvore, who created this logo.

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